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29. June 2010

CEN norms jeopardize EU targets

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Markus Feldmann, Bernd Hauke

The recycling or even reuse of complete building elements is one of the strong points of steel construction, and not only when it comes to sustainability. This is why the members of the European Union are compelled to implement the new EU waste framework directive by December 12 of this year. This directive envisages 80% of waste from construction and wreckage to be recycled or reused from 2020 onwards. Against this very backdrop of the new EU directive, it is inconceivable as to why the European Committee for Standardization (CEN), which is commissioned with the task of drawing up various norms to support the sustainability of buildings, has ignored this aspect of waste reduction and/or recycling.