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14. April 2010

Save the Teufelsgraben Bridge

Tamped concrete aqueduct from 1890 Constructions dating from the early years of concrete are rare in Germany. This makes it all the more regrettable that a prime example of tamped concrete is to fall victim to the pickaxe, namely the aqueduct between Munich and Mangfall, built in 1890.

Munich as the owner of the bridge has a special cultural responsibility to preserve this original monument. The Teufelsgraben bridge is an excellent testimonial to the history of building technology and to the history of the German construction industry: It has to be preserved!

An appeal by
Prof. Stefan M. Holzer

Supported by renowned engineers and conservationists