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01. September 2010

The impact of the code for sustainable homes on masonry house construction in England

Download the article from Mauerwerk 04/2010 for free.

John Roberts

In England masonry remains the predominant form of house construction and accounts for over 80 % of all new dwellings. The rate of replacement of the housing stock in the UK remains low and each dwelling is required to have a viable working life in excess of 100 years. This requires forms of construction that are durable, with low maintenance costs and that are sufficiently flexible to cope with extension, alteration and changes in performance requirements.