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29. April 2010

Turning point(s) of Building - From serial to digital Architecture

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Eberhard Möller

From March 18 through June 13, 2010, the museum of architecture at Munich's technical university is showing "Turning point(s) of Building" in the Pinakothek der Moderne. This exhibition, developed in cooperation with the departments of structural planning and architectural engineering, presents those discoveries and inventions that have become synonymous with the industrialization and digitalization of construction: From the Balloon Frame, Munich's Crystal Palace or Vladimir Suchov's gridshells (pictured) via spatial structures, prefabricated systems and construction robots right up to today's digitally designed open structures.