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06. April 2011

Sustainability

Editorial aus Structural Concrete 1/2011

Koji Sakai

Reducing greenhouse gases has become an issue of global importance.

A red flag has now been shown to those socioeconomic activities that have consumed resources and energy on a massive scale, and the market principles of mass production and mass consumption that have prevailed since the Industrial Revolution are now approaching an end. Human socioeconomic activities are meaningful only when the planet is in a sound condition, and human survival itself is vulnerable if the global climate changes drastically and loses its rhythm.